A simple way to keep track of garden changes

My life is hectic. I’m trying hard to cut down on distractions so I can enjoy a few things in my life more fully. One of those priorities is my garden.

shed and iris.jpeg

Sweet William (Dianthus barbatus) in shades of red and pink, planted among irises, lilies, and daffodils.

This year I had a glorious show of Sweet Williams (Dianthus barbatus). Sweet William is a biennial plant, meaning it grows, flowers, sets seed, and dies over the course of two years, rather than one for annuals.

They’re fading now, and setting seedpods. If I collect the seed, I can sow it and have another batch of plants ready to go for next year. And while I like the mixed-colors look, there are a few places I’d like to add these plants but I want to restrict the color scheme a bit.

As I went outside with brown paper envelopes in hand, I wondered how to differentiate between the different colors of Dianthus. How will I remember what’s what? Then I remembered the bit of genius always at my side: my smartphone.

I snapped photos of each color and immediately labeled them:

 

Then I labeled my paper seed envelopes to match.

I created an album in my iPhone Photos app to keep them organized, so when I’m planning my garden for next year I’ll have a quick reference. (Or I guess I could also come back here.)

How do you keep track of changes in your garden?

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Zinnias can take the heat

zinnia single yellow 3

It’s been appallingly hot, in the mid- to high 90s (35C), but the zinnias don’t seem to mind. The more I cut them, the more they bloom, so I cut them and enjoy indoors. I grew these from seed; they’re an excellent flower for gardeners new to seed-sowing to try.

Have a wonderful weekend.

Postcard of spring: Crocus tommasinianus

My first purple crocus, Crocus tommasinianus, bloomed over the weekend. When I see these fellows poking through the mud, I know spring really is nearly here.

tommies sunning

They’re not the first flowers to bloom in my spring garden, but they do seem to be the first ones to signal that warm weather is genuinely on its way.